A COLOURFUL CHAOTIC MESS.

“Why art? Simply because.”

“A colourful, chaotic mess. Art books were all over the place, with lenses and cameras. My aunts drew and painted. My uncle and father drew and painted. I grew up with the smell of acquaragia in my nostrils. Growing up in a photographic studio years back, when photos were coloured in transparent oils was the artistic experience par excellence. There’s your answer to Why art? It flows naturally, simply because.”

A COLOURFUL CHAOTIC MESS

“Why art? Simply because.”

“A colourful, chaotic mess. Art books were all over the place, with lenses and cameras. My aunts drew and painted. My uncle and father drew and painted. I grew up with the smell of acquaragia in my nostrils. Growing up in a photographic studio years back, when photos were coloured in transparent oils was the artistic experience par excellence. There’s your answer to Why art? It flows naturally, simply because.”

A COLOURFUL CHAOTIC MESS

“Why art? Simply because”

“A colourful, chaotic mess. Art books were all over the place, with lenses and cameras. My aunts drew and painted. My uncle and father drew and painted. I grew up with the smell of acquaragia in my nostrils. Growing up in a photographic studio years back, when photos were coloured in transparent oils was the artistic experience par excellence. There’s your answer to Why art? It flows naturally, simply because.

A COLOURFUL CHAOTIC MESS

“Why art? Simply because.”

“A colourful, chaotic mess. Art books were all over the place, with lenses and cameras. My aunts drew and painted. My uncle and father drew and painted. I grew up with the smell of acquaragia in my nostrils. Growing up in a photographic studio years back, when photos were coloured in transparent oils was the artistic experience par excellence. There’s your answer to Why art? It flows naturally, simply because.”

MARIA ROSSELLA DALMAS

Teaching herself the ways of the brush and learning from her family.

Daughter of Hamrun photographer and water colour artist Giuseppe Cassar, Maria Rossella Dalmas is a pharmacist by profession. But the influence her artistic family exerted on her since childhood was too strong to pass unnoticed. She looked up to her father for guidance, teaching herself the ways of the brush and learning from her family’s feedback on the paintings she produced.

Her aunts attended The School of Art in Old Bakery Street Valletta and her father who was a photographer by profession, often turned to his camera for artistic shots. “Photography is art,” Rossella tells us, brimming with stories from the long days in the studio with her family. “It allows you to take a snapshot, just a frame, a moment in time – leaving you feeling good upon seeing the final picture.”

Daughter of Hamrun photographer and water colour artist Giuseppe Cassar, Maria Rossella Dalmas is a pharmacist by profession. But the influence her artistic family exerted on her since childhood was too strong to pass unnoticed. She looked up to her father for guidance, teaching herself the ways of the brush and learning from her family’s feedback on the paintings she produced.

Her aunts attended The School of Art in Old Bakery Street Valletta and her father who was a photographer by profession, often turned to his camera for artistic shots. “Photography is art,” Rossella tells us, brimming with stories from the long days in the studio with her family. “It allows you to take a snapshot, just a frame, a moment in time – leaving you feeling good upon seeing the final picture.”

Along the years, Rossella, who is self taught, has developed her own technique with Acrylics, a style which suits her muse. Acrylics are versatile and dry fast and her personal style renders a quasi-pastel effect to the paintings. Her inspiration lies in the familiar, in that which surrounds her and which she loves; Maltese landscape, streetscapes and occasionally still life and portraits. “I am interested in the detail,” she explains with a small gleam in her eyes, “in the less obvious. In how shadows fall on objects and how colours seem to fuse and melt, becoming one. I try to see the painting in its entirety before I begin. If I don’t, it does not work out for me.”

IN THE FAMILY
Collaboration between two generations.

Rossella also has solo and collective exhibitions in her artistic repertoire, her latest being a retrospective exhibition at the APS HQ at Swatar. An interesting display, this exhibition was the fruit of a collaboration between two generations from two artistic families, Giuseppe and Maria Rossella together with Doranne Alden and her father Albert Caruana. A book was subsequently published on this rare and beautiful project which bridged time and artistic styles.

IN THE FAMILY
Collaboration between two generations.

Rossella also has solo and collective exhibitions in her artistic repertoire, her latest being a retrospective exhibition at the APS HQ at Swatar. An interesting display, this exhibition was the fruit of a collaboration between two generations from two artistic families, Giuseppe and Maria Rossella together with Doranne Alden and her father Albert Caruana. A book was subsequently published on this rare and beautiful project which bridged time and artistic styles.

mariapic

THE MALTESE SCENE
“The Maltese art scene is flourishing. I am proud to be part of this community.”

“The Maltese art scene is flourishing. I am proud to be part of this community.” Rossella goes on to praise the talent on this small island, as well as the ambition and drive which spurs the artists forward. “A foreign friend actually pointed this out to me as well. She went on to create the Malta Playing Arts deck of cards (incidentally available for sale at Agenda bookshops), with each card being painted by different artists. For my part, I painted the two of Hearts but there were also sculptors, ceramists and lace makers on board. It is indeed unlike any other deck you’ll ever see! A masterpiece in its own right.”

THE MALTESE SCENE
“The Maltese art scene is flourishing. I am proud to be part of this community.”

“The Maltese art scene is flourishing. I am proud to be part of this community.” Rossella goes on to praise the talent on this small island, as well as the ambition and drive which spurs the artists forward. “A foreign friend actually pointed this out to me as well. She went on to create the Malta Playing Arts deck of cards (incidentally available for sale at Agenda bookshops), with each card being painted by different artists. For my part, I painted the two of Hearts but there were also sculptors, ceramists and lace makers on board. It is indeed unlike any other deck you’ll ever see! A masterpiece in its own right.”

THE MALTESE SCENE
“The Maltese art scene is flourishing. I am proud to be part of this community.”

“The Maltese art scene is flourishing. I am proud to be part of this community.” Rossella goes on to praise the talent on this small island, as well as the ambition and drive which spurs the artists forward. “A foreign friend actually pointed this out to me as well. She went on to create the Malta Playing Arts deck of cards (incidentally available for sale at Agenda bookshops), with each card being painted by different artists. For my part, I painted the two of Hearts but there were also sculptors, ceramists and lace makers on board. It is indeed unlike any other deck you’ll ever see! A masterpiece in its own right.”

MARIA’S MESSAGE

“Stay humble, keep learning.”

Rossella’s message to younger artists is to remain humble, knowing you can never learn enough, seeking educational venues and joining art groups or going to art lessons. Reading always plays a part in improving oneself, as well as networking. Knowing the right people and having an ever growing number of contacts will take you quite a way. “But it’s also always a matter of believing in yourself, of believing that your next painting will be better. Never give up and don’t let anything let you down. Art is a case of trial and error. With experience you will know what will work and what will not. Don’t give up!”

MARIA’S MESSAGE

“Stay humble, keep learning.”

Rossella’s message to younger artists is to remain humble, knowing you can never learn enough, seeking educational venues and joining art groups or going to art lessons. Reading always plays a part in improving oneself, as well as networking. Knowing the right people and having an ever growing number of contacts will take you quite a way. “But it’s also always a matter of believing in yourself, of believing that your next painting will be better. Never give up and don’t let anything let you down. Art is a case of trial and error. With experience you will know what will work and what will not. Don’t give up!”